Buffalo Wins My Heart

Last week I attended a garden communicators’ conference in Buffalo. Why would we go to a town known more for its epic snow than gardens, you may ask? Well, because quite simply, Buffalo has great gardens. Lots of them.

The city hosts Garden Walk Buffalo one weekend in July, where more than 400 gardeners graciously open their garden gates to more than 65,000 visitors from near and far. It’s all voluntary and free. We arrived after this year’s event, but were welcomed into a number of the gardens in three parts of the city: the Cottage District, Elmwood Village, and Lancaster Avenue.

 

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Can you believe that the gardener who created and maintains this garden is color blind?

 

These small, urban gardens were a delight, all brimming with gorgeous flowers, foliage, and creativity. The passion, care, and skill each gardener put into their tiny space came through loud and clear. Most were there to greet us and tell us the story of their garden. It all felt wonderfully personal and warm.

 

However, something even more magical unfolded on the streets. Like most cities, Buffalo has had its share of problems. But as we walked from garden to garden along charming streets, it quickly became apparent that whole communities have embraced gardening, and the result is some astonishingly effective urban renewal.

House after house was graced with lovingly tended small gardens and overflowing window boxes, hanging baskets, and containers. These gardeners even planted the hell strips (space between the sidewalk and street).

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Even the hell strips are colorful and fun!

The homes were modest but neat and maintained. Common spaces were clean. Residents had also taken responsibility for planting and maintaining beautiful gardens in the islands between streets. Buffalo is living proof that

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gardening can be a powerful force for grassroots urban renewal and community building.

Aside from Garden Walk Buffalo, there are additional open gardens and garden-themed tours, festivals, exhibits, and education events in the Buffalo-Niagara region from June through August. It’s also fun to cruise around the many parks, parkways and traffic circles designed by Fredrick Law Olmstead, the father of U.S. landscape architecture. The Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens is lovely, and Frank Lloyd Wright aficionados can enjoy the Martin House in Buffalo and Graycliff, just 20 minutes south of town. Niagara Falls is just 40 minutes north of Buffalo too. Wherever you go around Buffalo, you are bound to run into great gardens and friendly gardeners.

Eating babies

IMG_9284While thinning beets in my garden the other day, I stopped to consider the little plants I was killing. The slim red root that would never grow into a round beet. The first tiny seed leaves and larger dark green adult leaves. They looked so fragile, uprooted from the soil. I knew that thinning the crowded seedlings was necessary if the chosen few I left in the ground were to mature into beets for my table. I felt some remorse for the ones I pulled out.

Then I wondered how these babies would taste. Afterall, you can eat beet greens and we grow beets for their roots. The pulled seedlings were nothing more than tender young leaves and immature roots. I brushed the soil off one of the tiny roots and tasted a leaf. It was crunchy and mild. I ate the rest of the leaves with the root and decided it was pretty delightful.

Mature beet greens are slightly bitter and tough, and are best sautéed with garlic and olive oil. But as I munched another seedling, I decided its delicious crunch and fresh green taste would be best raw, in a salad.

On my way from the garden I picked a few nasturtium flowers to add to the salad. Nasturtium flowers are tender and have a slightly peppery taste. Their bright yellow and orange petals add beautiful color to dishes.

The salad I made for dinner guests that evening consisted of rough chopped romaine lettuce, sliced cucumber and orange bell pepper, the little beet seedlings—washed and chopped in half—and a handful of nasturtium petals. I tossed it with a simple lemon dressing (recipe below).

You’d probably pay a fortune for this early summer treat in a fancy restaurant, but I will look forward to making it at home every time I sow beet seeds. In fact, I might be making room in my garden for an extra row of beet seedlings from this point on, just so I can eat the baby plants.

Simple lemon salad dressing

  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons brown mustard
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper

Shake all together in a jar with a tight fitting lid. Taste and correct flavors as needed. Dress salad and toss just before serving. Any leftover dressing can be refrigerated to use later.

Pictured here are golden beet seedlings and nasturtium flowers. I grew two other kinds of beets, Detroit Red and Chioggia, and they were tasty too.

 

Doves on the swing

Birds enliven our gardens. They fly, dart, and interact with one another. Their songs add beautiful sounds. They are helpful to us gardeners as they eat huge amounts of insects, especially while raising chicks, which helps keep their numbers in balance. It’s a delight to find nests in trees and shrubs when the leaves fall in autumn. I love to look closely to see how birds wove found bits into the nest structure: twigs, grass blades, and even ribbons of littered paper and plastic. Once I found a string still tied to bamboo skewers I had used to mark seeds I direct-sowed in the spring garden. I had wondered what had happened to that little rig…

If we’re lucky, birds make their nest where we can witness the construction process, along with eggs and raising of chicks.

A few days ago, I hung hummingbird feeders as I usually do in mid-April to welcome the weary little birds on their return north. As I stepped onto the front porch, feeder in hand, I nearly collided with a mourning dove, who flapped madly to get out of my way. I then noticed a puzzling amount of sticks and tangles of dried grapevine on the porch floor, and looked up. In the swing, still hung high for the winter, was a flat, haphazard nest with one white egg poking up. Robins have tried to nest in this same spot before, but I removed the start of those nests and lowered the swing to discourage them. But I was too late to dissuade these birds.

Mother dove is now a constant presence incubating her egg (or maybe eggs by now) just outside our living room window. We carefully peek to see how she’s doing, and she replies with a blink of her big dark eye. According to the Cornell Ornithology Lab website (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mourning_Dove/id), it will be another week before the chicks hatch, then another couple weeks until they fledge. Guess we won’t be using our porch swing for a while.

Find of the day: Bloodroot

Take a walk in the woods this time of year and you might spy this tiny beauty, bloodroot. I found one today along a stream bank in a low moist woods. And I mean one—there waIMG_7573sn’t another in sight. I was especially lucky to find it since bloodroot only blooms for a day or two.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) is a North American ephemeral wildflower that emerges in rich woods in late winter and early spring. Spring ephemerals flower and set seed quickly, before the trees leaf out to take advantage of sunlight, then go dormant once summer heats up. Other spring ephemerals include trillium, trout lily, Virginia bluebells, spring beauties, and Dutchman’s breeches.

As you can see, the leaf on this bloodroot was still wrapped around the stem, which is typical. The fragile flower opens during the day and closes at night, then fades after a day or two. The solitary leaf unfurls, displaying its unique deeply cleft shape, then grows to about 12-14 inches tall.

Bloodroot is in the poppy family and gets its name from the red-orange juice in its stem and roots. Native Americans used the juice to dye clothing and baskets, and for war paint. They also used it to treat aches and fevers, ringworm, ulcers, and skin infections. Alkaloid compounds in the juice are possibly useful for dissolving warts and reducing plaque on teeth, however it believed to be too toxic to be ingested.

If you have a moist woodland spot on your property, consider planting some bloodroot. It can be found at specialty native plant nurseries, such as Prairie Moon Nursery (prariemoon.com). Not only will you be charmed by its delicate, fleeting beauty, the winter-starved bees will welcome the early pollen and nectar it provides.

Miraculous seeds

Looking for a miracle? Just start some seeds. This determined little bean seedling emerged today from a seed that, a few days ago, looked like a wrinkled pebble. It’s hard to believe this vigorous little life was inside that dried-up orb.

seedlingSeeds contain everything to start a new plant–root, shoot, and two little seed leaves called cotyledons. Plus all the DNA that will determine the plant’s form, habit, flower color, fruits, and other attributes.

Give a seed a little moisture, light, and warmth and presto–new life erupts. How can you not believe in miracles when you watch a seed germinate?